Plagiarism Education Week – Free Webcast Series

10 04 2014

The 2nd annual Plagiarism Education Week virtual conference is April 21-25. Free, daily webcasts will share ideas and best practices to teach educators and students how to stop copying and start thinking critically.

  • Monday, April 21 – Understanding Plagiarism with Help from Dr. Seuss
  • Tuesday, April 22 – Tweets from the French Revolution? Using What Students Know to Promote Original Work and Critical Thinking
  • Wednesday, April 23 – “I Plagiarized My Child’s Birth”: From Extreme Plagiarism to Contextualized Understanding
  • Thursday, April 24 – How to Keep Your Job, Not Lose Your Reputation, Avoid Getting Sued, and Not Kill People
  • Thursday, April 24 – IRAC, Therefore I Write
  • Friday, April 25 – Survival of the Fittest: Adapting Methodologies for Successful Plagiarism Discussions

Visit Turnitin’s web site for more information on the sessions above and to register! Certificates of Participation are available.

Sponsors: AIC, SEE, 6IPC, NITLE, and PlagiarismToday.





How Can I Make My Multiple Choice Tests More Effective?

7 04 2014

Today’s 20 Minute Monday Morning Mentor is by Linda Suskie and talks about making your exams more effective. If you haven’t seen this short video, contact Nicole to get access to the video– it has many helpful tips to make your exams more effective. Linda’s supplemental materials include a blueprint for creating an examination that can also be used by students as a study guide. She also provides many useful tips on creating questions.

Here are a few tips that I found important:

  • Do not ask questions on trivia or common knowledge.
  • Avoid negative items and if you must use them, underline  and bold the NOT or EXCEPT.
  • Order responses numerically or alphabetically if single words are used.
  • Make Alternatives roughly all the same length.

There are many other tips, so be sure to contact Nicole D. for the link and check out her video and her “examples” handout.

Monday Morning Mentor

 





Fried Friday: Identifying Serious Sleep Disorders

4 04 2014

You and/or your students may be plagued by serious sleep disorders and not realize the cause. The Groat Center for Sleep Disorders provides some excellent examples for you. Enjoy your Friday and stay tuned for more tips and humor from your friends at Title III! Click image below to begin the video.

Groat Center for Sleep Disorders





Fried Friday: It’s as Easy as 1, 2 and 3!

28 03 2014

Attention all iPad users. Do you have a favorite website that you visit? Do you wish you had an icon on your desktop so you could just click on it and it would take you right there?

Tina, our newest Instructional Designer for Title III provides this Fried Friday tip:

  1. Navigate to your favorite website (may we suggest http://facultylearningcorner.wordpress.com)
  2. Click on the “share” icon
  3. Choose “add to home screen

You can change the name that will appear on the icon. It’s that simple! Now you have an icon that takes you right to the desired webpage. Can’t get much simpler than that!

Thank you Tina for this technology tip and welcome to the team!

Steps to make a website an icon





Learning Objectives and Course Goals

26 03 2014

Have you ever wondered what content sticks with your students after they complete your course? How much do they retain after five years? How about after ten years? Did they remember the main idea?

Standard II of the Peer Review process looks at some of the over-arching ideas that are essential in explaining the value of your course outside of the classroom setting. Join us on Monday, March 31st at 9 AM for our second installment of Thru the Lens. Tell other faculty about this unique chance to walk through two of your colleagues’ courses.

We will be looking at Marnie Chapman’s Biology 112:Human Anatomy and Physiology II, AND Maren Haavig’s Accounting 379: Fund and Governmental Accounting through the lens of Peer Review Standard II. Join us to see:

Peer Review Through the Lens

  • Different ways faculty use their syllabus to establish the course goals and clearly state class priorities.
  • Measurable course objectives written from a student’s view
  • Different ways to capture a student’s attention and focus it on the learning objectives
  • Ways faculty create clear and concise statements or checklists for assignments and due dates

Monday, March 31 at 9 AM we will use Collaborate  to meet so you can participate from your office or home. Please use the link shown, look for the “Tools Box” and click on “Participate Now” to attend. After joining the Collaborate session you will be given the information to log into each of the courses that we’ll be reviewing. Please have a headset with you so you participate by voice as well as text throughout the hour. If you have never done a Collaborate session before you might want to try logging in prior to the session to make sure you are ready at 9 am.

We hope you will join us for this session. It is a great way to see what other faculty are doing, share ideas, provide feedback and to gain more understanding of the peer review process and rubric. Mark your calendar today to reserve the date and time. We’ll post more information soon.  

Thank you Marnie and Maren for opening up your courses for this mini-peer review session!

Image: ©iStockphoto.com/Sergpet

 





Games Can Teach!

25 03 2014

Nicole and I just returned from an excellent training/conference in Orlando. One speaker who really resonated with both of us was Karl Kapp and his presentation “Game Elements for Learning, Engagement and Fun” (we even purchased several copies of his books to share with faculty at iTeach). We’ll let you know when they arrive on campus and you can check one out. Gamification isn’t just the newest buzzword.

Now, don’t get me wrong, neither of us are particularly thrilled about mixing games and education. Neither of us were sitting between sessions playing Angry Birds on our phone. That said, Karl Kapp’s research really did make us believers in the sense that there are better ways to look at your course, to make it appealing, to incorporate some of the elements from addictive games and figure out how your students might engage with your content more effectively if we learn from these popular gaming activities.

Karl Kapp Article on GamingHere is an article that he wrote in 2013 that links some gaming elements to educational strategies. I think, if you take a look, you won’t find this too far off the mark.

Additionally, during his Orlando presentation he took a close look at learning objectives. He told us basically, “Games start with action. Instructional designers and online courses start with learning objectives.” Hmmnm, from our student’s perspective, that doesn’t sound nearly as interesting, does it?

Instead of listing learning objectives for a course bullet by bullet, point by point, ASK A QUESTION. That’s right. Ask an intriguing question. Grab the interest of your student right away by presenting a scenario or choice — do they know the answer? No? Enter the learning module and find out. Or, ask a series of questions letting the student know that if they continue, they will find the answers. You want the learner primed to learn, excited to move on.

His take home message in the article is pretty compelling: The debate should not be whether games teach; instead, the debate should be how we leverage the best elements of games to create the best instruction for learners.

What do you think?

 





“Thru the Lens” Continues with a Look at Peer Review Standard II

14 03 2014

Please mark your calendar to join us on March 31st at 9 AM for the second “Thru the Lens” Peer Review session. We will be looking at  two courses (Marnie Chapman’s Biology 112:Human Anatomy and Physiology II, AND Maren Haavig’s Accounting 379: Fund and Governmental Accounting) through the lens of Peer Review Standard II.

Peer Review Through the LensStandard II deals with course outcomes and goals. We’ll be looking at:

  • Different ways faculty use their syllabus to establish the course goals and clearly state class priorities.
  • Course objectives to see if they are measurable and written from a student’s view
  • Different ways to capture a student’s attention and focus it on the learning objectives
  • Ways faculty create clear and concise statements or checklists for assignments and due dates

Monday, March 31 at 9 AM we will use Collaborate  to meet so you can participate from your office or home. Please use the link shown, look for the “Tools Box” and click on “Participate Now” to attend. After joining the Collaborate session you will be given the information to log into each of the courses that we’ll be reviewing. Please have a headset with you so you participate by voice as well as text throughout the hour. If you have never done a Collaborate session before you might want to try logging in prior to the session to make sure you are ready at 9 am.

We hope you will join us for this session. It is a great way to see what other faculty are doing, share ideas, provide feedback and to gain more understanding of the peer review process and rubric. Mark your calendar today to reserve the date and time. We’ll post more information soon.  

Thank you Marnie and Maren for opening up your courses for this mini-peer review session!

Image: ©iStockphoto.com/Sergpet





Improving Completion Rates in Online Developmental Math Courses

13 03 2014

mathPosterOn February 28, Patricia Brower, Math Technology Specialist, and Jeff Johnston, UAS Campus Director, presented at the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U) Conference in Portland on their Title III funded case study. The focus of the presentation was on the analysis of the changes made to the online developmental math courses at the Sitka Campus. Patricia and Jeff spoke with several attendees about the success of the case study and the improvements made to the completion rates of UAS’ online developmental math courses; the courses have sustained a 30% increase in completion rates over five continuous semesters.

Under the UAS Sitka Campus Title III grant, research was conducted to discover how we could increase completion rates for our online developmental math courses. Using the well known emporium model (where math is taught within a physical lab) as a guide, we set out to improve our completion rates by improving sustained engagement. In looking at the research data, we found that throughout the US, developmental math courses were serving as a barrier to completion not only of the math courses themselves, but of degrees in general. Creating an “impassable gateway” for many, and serving as a graveyard for college students, developmental math courses have proven to be in need of redesign so that student can acquire their degrees and to go on to successful careers. To learn more about the purpose and approach of the research read the brief report.

The case study brought much interest from campuses across the United States interested in the possibility of creating successful online courses for developmental mathematics. Jeff and Patricia presented on how through the project, the Title III team was able to adapt the emporium model to a completely online environment. This new “Virtual Emporium Model” is one of the first models used for online developmental math education. Mcgraw Hill is featuring the results of this case study for other Universities, so that they can see how to successfully use adaptive math programs like ALEKS on their own campuses.





Fried Friday: What President Are YOU?

7 03 2014

Fried Friday ladyIt’s that day of the week again, Friday. Do you need a little something extra this morning to bring on that smile? Well here’s something that just might do it.

Make a few selections and see what President you most resemble. It’s NOT just based on your dog selection either. Give it a try and see who you are, deep down!

If you have a good Fried Friday that you’d like to see us share, please contact us. We love posting your ideas!

To find your inner president start by clicking the “Pick Your Dog” image below. You can post a comment telling us which president you got!

Start the Selection





Ten Years of Tracking Online Education

6 03 2014

Are you interested in seeing the results of a survey of over 2800 Chief Academic Officers and academic leaders say about online learning over the past ten years? Do academics feel it takes more time to manage an online course? Are the student learning outcomes comparable? How many students are actually taking online courses?

Check out the infographic by Pearson Learning Solutions by clicking on the image below.

Click to see infographic








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